Why I still prefer DIY over packaged tours

There’s a lot of things that make a DIY travel awesome. It’s cheaper obviously, more flexible in terms of schedule and bonds people better, perhaps due to shared responsibility among the group.

But this isn’t the reason why I prefer DIY over joining packaged tours.

Because when you think about it, DIY has its challenges too. You have to send invites to friends, who may or may not show up. You have to do all the research, reservations and sometimes even cooking. But it’s still better than its alternative, in my opinion.

Why?

Because a lot of travel and tours have awful services.

Experiences with packaged tours

First of all, let me clarify. When I say travel and tours all throughout this post, I’m referring mainly to unregistered entities, those who operate mainly via Facebook pages and are managed by one or few individuals.

You might have read a complaint or rant about a travel and tours already. This type of posts in Facebook appear every now and then. Or, you might have an experience on your own.

Our case isn’t as bad as the others, but it’s enough to discourage me from joining packaged tours again, especially if there are still other options.

There’s this one trip I joined where the van left me while I took a quick nip at the nearby convenience store. I came back at the parking slot and our transport was gone. A security guard approached me and said our organizer left an instruction for me to follow them to the resort destination. I didn’t have my phone and only a few coins. You know that feeling na iniwan ka. It sounds funny now and it’s been a subject of jokes, but back then it really wasn’t.

Another experience was a road trip with Hali. Our organizer (1) didn’t prepare a seating arrangement in the van and (2) didn’t employ a first-come first-serve policy either. We arrived in the meetup place first, and we were outside the parking lot with him while waiting. When it was time to go, he called over the rest of the group to be seated before turning to us. So, Hali and I had separate seats. When I pointed this out to him, he said he didn’t know we wanted to be seated together.

We found out later that the rest of the group were regular clients.

That was just the first of the many (relatively minor but still annoying) complaints we had on that trip.

More examples here, here and here

Other people’s cases are worse compared to ours.

If you haven’t been under the rock, you probably know about what happened to Sombrero Island in Burias in 2016, when about 100 tourists in the island got stranded due to bad weather. That in itself isn’t bad, but thereafter, many issues surfaced via a whirlwind of online posts from angry guests (e.g., the group was apparently not registered in the tourism office and the coast guard was not aware of more people needed rescuing, etc.). Amidst the PR disaster, the tour’s Facebook page was deactivated.

(I’m not personally involved in this and am not aware if it has ever been resolved, but I think a lot of local backpackers are familiar with this story.)

Related Read: 8 Signs You Hired A Bad Tour Operator for Your Travel

Of course, the worst of the lot are scammers, those who cancel events at the last minute (read: hours before the trip) and those who push through despite travel or weather warnings and end up endangering their guests.

Many organizers also fail to deliver terms advertised. It can be anything from transportation (overcrowded seats instead of the “comfortable” ride), meal inclusions (poorly prepared food instead of “buffet meals”) to accommodations (no reservation at all).

A wake-up call to tour organizers

Everybody makes mistakes, that’s true. As travelers or tourists, its part of our experience to have ups and downs. Still, it doesn’t make tour organizers less accountable or responsible for their mistakes.

Accountability and responsibility are the two attributes that seem to be missing from many tour organizers.

When guests complain, many don’t listen, much more address it. When a big issue comes up, they take down their Facebook page and hide. Refunds are out of the options.

I distinctly remember this Facebook thread where a few guests complained about their organizer being late and so and so… The organizer replied publicly, saying they asked too much for paying so little. “What would you expect for a P999 tour?”

I don’t know about other people, but I’d expect a good P999 tour.

So, just to reiterate: tour organizers should learn how to be accountable and responsible. If you’re working for a travel and tours — and yes, we understand that it’s hard — you have to know that it’s not just about the money. Guest experience comes first. There’s a reason there’s a whole bunch of courses dedicated to “customer service” and “customer experience.” It’s because it should be your #1 priority, not how much money you’ll earn. Income will follow.

Good service creates loyalty, and this is a proven long-term business strategy.

So far…

So, today I’m still leaning towards DIY travel, even though in some cases it’s more demanding and even expensive. I also had a few good experiences with packaged events (our road trip to Kalanggaman Island was top-notch, for instance), but currently they are too few to convince me otherwise.

Packaged tours are oftentimes a last resort, and when I do I make sure that the organizer is personally vouched by someone I know or, if not, the destination is somewhere I really want to go to.

To be clear, I didn’t write this to complain or to portray a bad picture of travel and tours (based in Manila in particular) but rather to call for improvement in terms of service quality… considering the proliferation of tour organizers who — let’s admit — are not fully equipped to be in this field.

Someone has to say these things.

I’m still hopeful that, in the future, we’ll see a more positive trend of service from travels and tours.

 

What’s your take about this topic? Let us hear it please!

6 Comments

  1. Gosh, I also dislike packaged tours. They always tell you how nice their tour is and what thousand things they will show you, yet in the end, it turns out be something that I could have very easily done on my own and would have seen the same things. (Mainly they skipped parts of what they promised.) When I approached the manager with that problem, he answered “what? I told the guide to show you this and that! I will talk to him to let him know for the future” – but of course the fees for the unsuccessful tour are not returned….

  2. True. I always loved DIY tours as you can control your time and places to visit and your money. I have had hassles with an organized tour when we went to Pahiyas Festival, that was really annoying. I don’t want that to happen again.

  3. I personally love DIY tours because you can work it around your wants and needs. I sometimes don’t want to spend so much time at one place and am disappointed that we didn’t go to another place. Plus it is much cheaper to figure it out on your own. That’s crazy that you have been left behind! Luckily enough people have waited for me or others before at least, but still, sorry you had to deal with that!

  4. I couldn’t agree more with what you have said! I find that you discover far more about the culture of the place you are visiting if YOU don’t take the packaged tours option. In my opinion travel is all about the discovery of somewhere new! And I can’t stand it when OTT touristy gimmicks get it the way of an authentic experience.

  5. I would say those tour operators are into this business more for money reasons than for passion.
    If you are passionate then you will go the extra mile to deliver the goods.
    I being a tour operator, try to go the extra mile to make my guests comfortable. I just can’t risk being bad mouthed by my clients. No way.

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